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13 Things Men Should Be Doing When You’re Trying to Get Pregnant

4 min


WATCH YOUR WEIGHT

“The healthier the body, the healthier the sperm,” says Jamin Brahmbhatt, MD, co-director of the PUR Clinic in Clermont, Florida. A study by Harvard School of Public Health found that overweight men were 11 percent more likely to have a low sperm count and 39 percent more likely to have no sperm at all in their ejaculate than normal-weight men. The news was even worse for men who were obese; they were 42 percent more likely to have a low sperm count and 81 percent more likely to produce no sperm than men at a normal weight.

DITCH THE CIGARETTES

Smoking doesn’t just affect your lungs, it can also impact your fertility. “Smoking is known to affect our sperm count, motion, and general health of sperm. Tobacco metabolites can even be found in semen,” says Edmund Sabanegh, MD, director of the Center for Male Fertility at Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. The good news: Sperm health seems to bounce back relatively quickly once men quit.

GET ENOUGH SLEEP

It’s important to use your bed for more than just sex when you’re trying to make a baby. A study at Boston University School of Public Health followed nearly 800 couples who were trying to conceive and found that men who slept less than six hours and more than nine hours a night had a 42 percent lower probability of getting their partners pregnant than men who slept seven to eight hours each night. Researchers believe hormones are likely to blame for the lower chance of pregnancy; testosterone is crucial for sperm production and most of it is produced when men are asleep. 

TEST YOUR SPERM

Women often track their ovulation at home to determine the small window each month when they have the greatest chance of conceiving. Now, men can monitor something of their very own, right alongside them: sperm. Trak Male Fertility Testing System is a new FDA-approved at-home test where men can measure their sperm count. A corresponding app then allows them to track their daily habits (eating, sleep, exercise, etc.) to determine how those factors may be affecting their sperm health. “A lot of couples keep trying and never know until they finally see a specialist what’s going on. This way, they can start checking for stuff at home and make changes through the help of the app before they even see a doctor,” says Dr. Brahmbhatt. While the Trak system isn’t meant to replace the help of fertility specialists should your sperm count come back low (a small device uses centrifugal force to isolate the sperm from your semen sample and rates the count on a three-tiered scale of low, moderate, optimal), Dr. Brahmbhatt says that it usually takes at least three months to see a change in sperm quality after making necessary lifestyle adjustments, so checking things out at home first can get the ball rolling in the right direction.

LIMIT YOUR CAFFEINE CONSUMPTION

You and your mommy-to-be should both limit caffeine intake when you’re prepping for baby. A new study in the journal Reproductive Toxicology found that men who consumed more than 300 milligrams of caffeine a day (mainly via soda and energy drinks) had a lower chance of getting their partner pregnant compared to those who took in less caffeine. One can of a popular energy drink contains a little more than 100 milligrams of caffeine. More research needs to be done to determine the link.

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